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home : columnists : time was May 26, 2016

The wheels of commerce grind to a halt
THE UNION  SALOON and Boarding House, operated by William Clark, was one of the businesses operating in Braidwood during the coal mine strike of the 1870s. Businesses were hard hit when the striking miners couldn’t pay their debts but still needed to purchase goods and services.
THE UNION SALOON and Boarding House, operated by William Clark, was one of the businesses operating in Braidwood during the coal mine strike of the 1870s. Businesses were hard hit when the striking miners couldn’t pay their debts but still needed to purchase goods and services.
The terrible life of miners and their families during the strike has been well documented in this column. But the ripple effect of the strike affected others who also depended on the miners' income, the business men. Today we look at the precarious position of those who were the providers of food, clothing and other services to those who had no way to pay for them.
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Put on a happy face, old jokes are still funny
If there is one thing we all need these days, it's a smile. Today I hope to make you smile, or at least groan, 19th century style. Ed Conley, editor of the Wilmington Advocate is on stage, it's comedy time!
Wednesday, May 25, 2016
The company stooge, beware the bribe
The above term does not refer to a guy who does slapstick comedy, but rather a man being paid by the company to do their bidding, whatever that might be. As the winter of 1877 came on, the demand for coal started to rise. With little coal being dug in the Wilmington coal fields, the companies started to lose money in a big way. They needed the striking miners back at work and soon. The tactic this time was the company stooge.
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Two sides to every story, what really happened
Every newspaper tries to get it right the first time. That goes without saying. However, sometimes the take on the story depends on who you interview. In this case Ed Conley, editor of the Wilmington Advocate, took the high road when he got it wrong. Set the wayback machine for October 1873; place, the streets of Wilmington.
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Wild Wilton, looking at the other side
Last time we told of the peaceful life in Wilton Center, where playing croquet was the most exciting thing ever. But it wasn't. Today we tell a much more exciting story that took place in Wilton on Nov. 24, 1875.
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Taking sides, the fourth estate steps in
The above archaic term was used to describe what we would now call "the press." It comes from 18th century England, and it meant those who hold power, but are not openly recognized as powerful. During the black year of 1877, every newspaper within 100 miles reported the chaos that had become Braidwood. Almost all of them took sides, but some were more powerful than others.
Wednesday, May 11, 2016


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